Specific Wildlife Information

Coyotes & Other Mammals
Tips for Minimizing or Avoiding Conflicts
  • Do not feed wildlife, including coyotes and other mammals. Many wildlife conflicts are caused by people directly or indirectly feeding wildlife. Wildlife do not need our assistance to find food, and feeding them ultimately hurts the wildlife, the environment, and the community. Secure your trash and any compost bins, avoid feeding pets outdoors, appropriately manage or remove bird feeders to avoid attracting undesirable wildlife, and regularly clean outdoor grills.
  • Close off crawl spaces under porches and sheds, and block access to attics and chimneys, where coyotes and small mammals may try to make dens.
  • Protect your pets from wildlife by not leaving them outside unattended, and ensuring their vaccinations are up to date.
  • Some animals, such as coyotes, can be scared away using appropriate hazing or deterrent techniques such as loud noises, throwing objects near the animals, and bright lights. A human presence may deter these animals, but do not attempt to touch coyotes or other animals, which can ultimately harm yourself and/or the animals and may lead to additional conflicts.
  • View the general wildlife page for information on wildlife conflicts.
Eastern Coyote Resources
Other Mammal Resources
Other mammals include bats, deer, foxes, raccoons, squirrels, and skunks.
Canada Geese, Turkeys & Other Birds
Tips for Minimizing or Avoiding Conflicts
  • Do NOT feed wildlife, including Canada geese, turkeys or waterfowl. These birds are well-adapted to their environments and do not need our assistance to find food. Bird feeders may be appropriate for attracting and providing supplemental food for song birds, but they should be managed appropriately to avoid attracting undesirable wildlife. Consider minimizing bird feeders and removing them during the spring and summer when natural food sources are more abundant.
  • Some birds, such as Canada geese, can be scared away using appropriate hazing or deterrent techniques such as decoys, scarecrows and other unfamiliar objects, and loud noises. A human presence may deter these animals, but do not attempt to touch Canada geese or other birds, or their eggs or nests, which can ultimately harm yourself and/or the birds and may lead to additional conflicts.
  • View the general wildlife page for information on wildlife conflicts.
Canada Geese Resources
Wild Turkey Resources
Other Bird Resources
To learn more about birds in Massachusetts and bird watching, visit Mass Audubon's website for birds and birding.

In the spring of 2010, Town Meeting passed Article 19, Resolution to protect birds by supporting the use of bird-safe building designs and encouraging building owners to reduce lighting during the spring and fall migratory bird seasons. To learn more about the challenges birds face from collisions with glass and buildings, and confusion from artificial lighting, and to see guidelines for bird-safe building and development, visit New York City Audubon's website or the City of Toronto's
website
.

All Wild Animal Resources
For information on other mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, fish and invertebrates in Massachusetts, including both common and rare species, please visit Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife website.