On recrute !
Town of Brookline
What to Recycle PDF Print E-mail

Curbside Recycling for Brookline

All recycling is to be placed in the blue toter with at least 2' of space and placed at curb so Automated recycling vehicles can lift toters.

PAPER

  • Newspaper (with inserts)
  • Magazines/ catalogs, phone books
  • Junk mail
  • Office paper/brown bags
  • No soiled paper or plastic bags
  • paperboard (e.g. cereal boxes)
  • milk cartons, oj cartons etc
  • Cardboard must be broken down and placed in toter. If the broken down cardboard is too large for the toter residents may take their cardboard to the Farmers Market parking lot located at the Center St  parking lot in Coolidge corner. Place cardboard in our cardboard Recycling center between the hours of 7am and 7pm

 

  • CONTAINERS
  • Glass bottles/jars-Remove collars, neck rings, and corks. Labels may stay on. No broken or other glass such as light bulbs, window or auto glass, dishes, glasses, Pyrex.
  • Aluminum and steel/tin food and beverage cans, empty aerosol cans and aluminum foil-Labels may stay on. No cans containing hazardous material. May be flatten.
  • Plastic bottles and jars marked 1 thru 7
  • Remove lids & neck rings. No plastic bags (they clog the conveyer belts in processing).
  • All recycling is to be placed in the blue toter and placed at curb so Automated recycing vehices can lift toters.

COMPUTER MONITORS TELEVISIONS AND ELECTRONIC ITEMS
The DPW  collects curbside for residents on municipal trash service computer monitors and televisions. Please schedule pickup one week in advance by calling the DPW at (617)730-2156.
Electronic items including TV’s and CRT’s may be dropped off at the Hazardous waste recycling facility every Thursday from 7:30am to 12:30 pm May thru October located at 815 Newton St.


PLASTIC BAG RECYCLING
The following list of stores will take plastic bags and other recycled material. Stop and Shop, Whole Foods, Roche Bros, Star Markets and Osco drugs. Please visit www.earth911.com for more info.




 BATTERY RECYCLING

 

Alkaline Manganese Batteries

Where It's At: Alkaline batteries ( A, AA, AAA,C and D) are used in everything from cameras and flashlights to remote controls.

 

What to Do: In Brookline we place these in with our regular trash. This is partly due to the Mercury-Containing and Rechargeable Battery Management Act passed in 1996 that phased out the use of mercury in alkaline batteries, making them less of an issue when disposed in landfills.

 

Silver Oxide Batteries

Where It's At: This is the more common form of the button cell battery, which you'll usually find in calculators, hearing aids and wristwatches. In addition to their small size, button cells are known for a long storage life and the ability to work well in low temperatures

 

What to Do: Recycle these batteries at the Municipal Service Center 870 Hammond St or The Town Hall 4th floor DPW office front desk. Follow the instructions on the box before placing them in the box.

 

Lithium-Ion (Li-ion) Batteries

Where It's At: One of the newest forms of rechargeable technology is the Li-ion battery, which is commonly found in cellular phones and consumer electronics.

 

What to Do: Recycle these batteries at the Municipal Service Center 870 Hammond St or The Town Hall 4th floor DPW office front desk. Follow the instructions on the box before placing them in the box.

 

Nickel-Cadnium (Ni-Cd) Batteries

Where It's At: Ni-Cd batteries are the inexpensive rechargeable form of alkaline batteries. They can be recharged hundreds of times to avoid disposing of batteries and are, for the most, part interchangeable with alkalines.

 

What to Do: Recycle these batteries at the Municipal Service Center 870 Hammond St or The Town Hall 4th floor DPW office front desk. Follow the instructions on the box before placing them in the box.

 

All other types of batteries will be accepted from May thru October on Thursdays at our Household Hazardous Recycling center located at 815 Newton St.

 

If you have any questions please email Ed Gilbert at







CELL PHONE RECYCLING
 Recycle Cell phones at the Municipal Service Center 870 Hammond St or The Town Hall 4th floor DPW office front desk.Also starting in May the Household Hazardous waste recycling facility every Thursday May thru October from 7:30am to 12:30 pm located at 815 Newton St.




Where Does My Recycling Go?

Do you wonder where your recycling goes once your blue bin is emptied at the curb?
Do you wonder what your recycling is made into?

The Town has a contract with Waste Management to collect recycling from over 13,255 households and about 60 businesses in Brookline each week. WMGMT sends out three recycling trucks. The recycling trucks are set up to pick up our blue single stream toters automatically with an arm attached to the side of the truck> THIS IS WHY IT IS IMPORTANT to make a clear path to your toter when possible.
When the truck is full, WMGMT brings the material to the WGMT recycling facility located in Avon Ma, where the material gets weighed, sorted and baled. About 150 recycling trucks dump material at the facility .
At WMGT Avon, the processing of recyclables is assisted by advanced sorting technology. In addition, recycling processing is labor intensive. This reinforces the importance of properly preparing your recycling!

None of the recyclable containers are washed at the processing facility; so dirty recyclables are considered trash. If a recycling truck is mixed or contains trash, the entire load can be rejected leading to additional processing costs and more material sent to landfill or incinerators. This is why it is important that you rinse out jars, cans and tubs so that the materials are free from food. In addition,


About 500 tons of paper is processed each day. While the paper and cardboard move along the conveyor belt, electronic eyes and then people separate the material into difference "grades" and remove contaminants. For example, pizza boxes (covered with grease)are considered a contaminant because of the grease and food residue.

On another conveyor, as the commingled containers flow along, metals are yanked out from overhead magnets and propelled into a holding area. Broken glass and bottle caps shake out and fall onto a lower conveyor for further processing.

The remaining material: plastics, aluminum and milk cartons are blown around by air jets strategically placed to push and draw light materials over to a manual sorting conveyor. Glass containers travel onto another conveyor where the clear containers are separated from the colored glass.

Once everything is thoroughly sorted, the material is baled separately. Huge bales of plastics, metals, paper and cardboard are stacked up in the facility and await loading into export containers, trailers and rail cars for direct shipment to companies that use the material to make new products.
Each month, WMGT provides the town a monthly market report. Although demand for the material and the end markets fluctuate, the end destinations are relatively constant.